Bolia student design award winners

Bolia student design award winners

Three winners have been chosen from nearly 1000 entries in this year's design competition held by Bolia, one of Denmark's top modern furniture companies

Danish designer Emily Broom won first prize in the 2020 Bolia Design Awards for her Zen rug, woven from recycled PET yarn for sustainability. 

This year's three winners of Bolia's 2020 Design Award are:
 
Emily Broom, based in Denmark, who took First Prizer for her Zen rug made from recycled PET
 
The Sustainable Award went to German designer Georgia von le Fort for her Relics, a series of containers made from recycled porcelain waste, designed to extend the shelf life of fruit and vegetables.
 
The Customer Prize was given to Ukrainian designer Stepan Korobetskyi, for his lightweight, wooden Folding One Chair
 
 
Relics - a winner in Bolia's design awards 2020
Georgia von le Fort
Zen rug by Emily Broom is made from recycled PET yarn
Folding One chair
Stepan Korobetskyi
The Zen Rug impressed jurors because they felt it  'meets a need to feel safe, grounded, and recover a serenity that has disappeared in these uncertain times.' Inspired by the Japanese stone gardens "Karesansui" or "Zen", the rug evokes nature through simple clean lines and while it meets the sustainability criteria by being woven in recycled PET yarn.
 
Relics by the Georgia von le Fort came out of her desire to recycle porcelain waste. Put these pieces under cold water before putting your fruit and veg in them, and produce will keep coll thanks to the evaporation process. 
 
Stepan Korobetskyi's designed his wooden Folding One Chair because he felt the lack of attractive folding chairs made from renewable materials - most are made from plastic or aluminium.  The chair is ideal for small spaces, it's lightweight and easy to move around and because it folds flat, it would easy to transport in large numbers.
 
Bolia set up its international design awards in 2007 as a way to encourage sustainability as a driving force in designers' work.
 
 
 
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