Commonwealth's new approach to climate change

Commonwealth's new approach to climate change

The Commonwealth believes regenerative development can reverse climate change

A Commonwealth conference in London this week (18 May) will look at ways of reversing human impact on climate change. Working with the Cloudburst Foundation, the Commonwealth is pursing what it's calling regenerative development as a way to minimise harm caused to the environment. Keynote speakers include former Irish president Mary Robinson.

The Commonwealth, in collaboration with the Cloudburst Foundation, is hosting its Regenerative Development to Reverse Climate Change Conference this week, which will see the launch of a new initiative aimed at reversing the effects human activity has had on climate.
 
Delegates will discuss next steps, including introducing the new Commonwealth strategy at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, Cop23, in November, and rolling it out to Commonwealth member governments.
 
Commonwealth High Commissioners, leading climate change experts and representatives from the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and other international organisations are due to attend, and they'll hear from keynote speakers including:
 
Anote Tong, global advocate on climate change action and former president of Kiribati
Mary Robinson, former UN Secretary General’s special envoy on climate change and former president of Ireland
New York bestselling climate change author Paul Hawken
Scientist Janine Benyus
design, art, science, and technology specialist David McConville
Regenerative development authority Ben Haggard
 
Delegates will also be presented with the findings of a two-day Commonwealth climate change workshop which took place last October. More than 60 scientists, ecologists, activists, academics and funders explored cutting-edge technologies and approaches to reduce harmful carbon emissions and tackle global warming, while addressing poverty and boosting economic development. They also discussed how these approaches can fit into the Commonwealth programme on climate change, which includes the Climate Finance Access Hub to help countries access millions pledged by the international community for climate action.
 
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