Garden to reduce your carbon footprint

Garden to reduce your carbon footprint

However large or small your outside space, use it to benefit you and the environment

You can grow fruit and veg in containers at home

Do your bit for the environment by growing your own fruit and veg. You'll save money, reduce your CO2  emissions and be on the way to eating a fabulously healthy diet

Your garden and CO2
 
If you want to do your bit to help curb CO2 emissions, get outside and start gardening! We all know that plants absorb carbon dioxide, one of the major greenhouse gases, so even if you're short of space, you can start growing things in vertical pockets attached to walls, or in containers.
 
Increase green cover in the garden
 
If you have a sizeable garden, it is recommended you plant some (indigenous) trees. Trees offer wide coverage so the amount of CO2 they absorb is greater than that absorbed by small shrubs. If you don't have space for a tree, then plant flowers, herbs and shrubs where you can - in borders, along fence edges and in pots. Plants do need some tending of course and it's important to read up on what type of soil, how much sunlight and water they each need, because plants and flowers are not all the same. Research the ideal environment for your plants and try to recreate it in your home.
By replacing heat-absorbing materials such as concrete and wood with grass, flowers, trees, and shrubs, you'll also reduce the urban heat effect. 
 
Grow your fruits and vegetables
 
Growing your own fruit and veg will result in a substantial reduction to your carbon footprint. By reducing the distance between the place your food originates and your kitchen, you're cutting out the food miles. When food is air and road freighted, that transport generates large amounts of CO2, whereas growing strawberries, raspberries, courgettes, apples...the list can go on and on... in your garden means the only transport involved in getting food on your plate is a few footsteps. And by making few visits to the shops you'll be using less plastic, since a lot of food is still wrapped in plastic.
 
Create a carbon sink
 
New terminologies are springing into our vocabulary every day and one of them is carbon sink. This is anything that absorbs more carbon than it releases as CO2. Plants and soil are some of the most efficient natural carbon sinks. 
 
Early detection of climate change
 
A forest protection mandate was issued by King Canutus the Dane in 1016, and in the 14th century, King Edward I enacted a law banning the burning of coal because it was deemed to be causing the skies of England to blacken and making people sick. We have been aware of the importance of protecting the environment for centuries.
 
Manmade climate change
 
The burning of coal led to manmade climate change. Climate change has escalated because of the amount of fuel burned to heat and run homes, factories, and vehicles. The two main gases that affect our climate are carbon dioxide and methane; scientists know that In the UK the breakdown of gas emissions is: 86 per cent carbon dioxide, 7 per cent methane, 6 per cent nitrous oxide and 1 per cent refrigerant gases.
 
UK’s commitment
 
With approximately 15 million tons of CO2 being emitted around the world each day, according to scientists at the University of California, drastic measures are needed to curb harmful practices. The UK acknowledges its contribution to global warming and has become the first country to have carbon budgets that are legally binding. The UK is committed to eliminating greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. A key step people can take to reduce their own carbon footprint, and so carbon emissions from the UK, is to eat less meat, since animals, especially sheep and cattle, emit huge amounts of methane.  So by growing fruit and veg in the garden, you'll be moving towards a more plant-based diet and saving the planet in the process.
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