Posters: Art on the Underground with AntikBar

Posters: Art on the Underground with AntikBar

The renowned experts in original vintage posters are hosting a talk about London Underground's hugely successful Art On The Underground programme ahead of an online auction of some of its original posters

Chinatown poster by John Bellany

Art on the Underground poster campaign was launched in the 1980s by then marketing director Dr Henry Fitzhugh to put art into London commuters' lives. AntikBar is holding an online auction on 1 July of some of the original posters produced for the project by leading contemporary artists; and ahead of the auction it's hosting a talk about the project by Dr Fitzhugh on 22 June at its showroom at 404 Kings Road in London. Tickets £5. Pictured above: Chinatown on the Underground by John Bellany, 1987. Starting bid: £40.

Vintage posters have become hugely collectible and people around the world have discovered the joys of building up their own collections on themes that matter to them. If capital cities and transport are your subject of interest, then don't miss London dealer AntikBar's auction of a wide range of those wonderful posters we'll all have enjoyed looking at as we move through London's underground stations - and with low reserve prices there could be bargains to be had..

The online auction starts at 3pm on Saturday 1 July - you'll need to register your interest and you can see a preview of the posters at AntikBar's gallery from 28 June.

Talk on 22 June

And if you'd like to know more about Art on the Underground, head to AntikBar's showroom at 6.30pm on 22 June to hear all about the project from the man whose idea it was - former London Underground marketing director Dr Henry Fitzhugh. He'll explain how in the early '80s passenger numbers for the underground fell, and that in turn had a knock-on effect on advertising because it meant many of the advertising slots that line the escalator walls were left empty. They didn't look very appealing so Dr Fitzhugh thought what was needed was some artwork that would celebrate the capital's great sights and encourage people to reach them on the tube. Londoners delighted in the posters and the London Underground art project has continued to flourish.

 

 

.
.
.