Revive: reclaimed wood gets a new lease of life

Revive: reclaimed wood gets a new lease of life

If manicured perfection isn't for you and you prefer your wood to look like wood and have a story to tell, then Revive furniture is for you. The team combines wood with plant-based resin to make strikingly beautiful tables

By Abby Trow
Revive family dining table

With sustainability at its heart, Revive is a new studio that takes reclaimed timber (such as English walnut and Sussex oak) and often by combining it with a plant-based resin, re-works it into pieces of furniture that look both traditional and contemporary. Based in the Sussex town of Lewes, Revive was launched by Jon Neal and Ed Gunter who've now been joined by craftsman Chris Scott-Smith. Prices from £1,200 ex VAT

Pieces of shrapnel from WW2 bombs, giant holes made by hornet nests and fractures caused by lightening strikes are just a few of the unique markings you’ll find in furniture made by Revive Joinery.
 
Friends Ed Gunter and Jon Neal, who both quit their day jobs to start the company, see beauty in what others might see as undesirable. They know the history of every piece of wood they use and work with a team of trusted arborists and sawmills.
 
'We minimise waste as much as possible with every one of our designs,' says Neal. 'Trees grown sustainably on our own door step have a treasure trove of features, imperfections and character that we love to enhance.'
 
 
Coffee table made from reclaimed wood with plant-based resin on a metal base
A huge bespoke coffee table with blue 'rivers' running through it
Ed adds: 'Using sustainable materials isn’t just about the beautiful slabs themselves. Well-managed forests also have a positive impact on biodiversity.  In a world of mass produced items, our clients appreciate that their unique purchases don’t harm the environment.'
 
About the resin
 
The resin used by Revive contains 70 per cent bio content and the remaining 30 per cent is made from by-products from plastic production. It's understood this resin contains the highest bio-material content of any resin on the market -  at present a 100 per cent bio content resin is not available. 
 
Revive will use glass in around 20 per cent of their River Tables but the reason for using resin predominantly is that greater depth can be achieved. Glass has a maximum thickness of 8mm where as the resin is not limited and can be as thick as the slabs of wood. 
 
Eco footprint
 
Revive say they've calculated the eco footprint of a piece of their furniture against that of a mass-produced item. Revive say they average 320 miles from source, to saw mill, to workshop, to final destination. A mass produced item from a large retailer, typically imported from Indonesia or China, is over 7,500 miles. In many cases, the timber is sourced in Europe, flown to a region such as Indonesia where the product is made and then flown back to the UK. And that's before it's shipped to the UK customer's address. 
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