From Rome to the Royal Crescent: model celebration of 250th anniversary of Bath's Royal Crescent

From Rome to the Royal Crescent: model celebration of 250th anniversary of Bath's Royal Crescent

Architectural model maker Timothy Richards exhibits his work at No 1 Royal Crescent Museum as part of the celebrations of one of Britain's most recognisable and beautiful streets

model maker Timothy Richards' work is renowned

Bath-based model maker Timothy Richards has perfected the art of miniaturising the world's great buildings, including No 1 Royal Cresent. His studio makes buildings using plaster, while windows are glazed and railings are metal so they are true to the materials as well as the scale of the real thing. The Bath Preservation Trust has organized an exhibition of Richards' work at the No 1 Royal Crescent museum. Called From Rome To The Royal Crescent, it runs from February to June 2017

Step inside No 1 Royal Crescent and you'll feel you've been teleported back to the 18th century because this charming museum has been decorated and furnished as it would have been between 1776-1796. If Georgian England is your favourite period of history, it's a must-visit.
 
This year is the 250th anniversary of the of the laying of the foundation stone that marked the start of the construction of Bath's sweeping Royal Crescent (it was laid on 19 May 1767), the first building to be put up being the gracious Palladian townhouse No 1; to celebrate the Royal Crescent, the Bath Preservation Trust has organised an exhibition of the remarkable work of Bath architectural model maker Timothy Richards. His works include No 1 Royal Cresent, and many other iconic buildings from around the world.
Carrying the model of No1 Royal Crescent into the museum
The museum at No1 Royal Crescent is on the east side of the street
Richards started making his plaster models in the late '80s and his meticulously made mini buildings have won him a clientele that includes prestigious organisations such as Harvard University as well as leading architects and designers. Larger models can cost many thousands of pounds but small plaster replicas can be bought from £80, so if there's a building you'd love to have on your desk, you may well find it on Richards' website.
 
Buildings so skilfully miniaturised you'll see in the exhibition include Somerset House and Kensington Palace in London, the Chrysler and Flatiron buildings in Manhattan, as well as the Lincoln Memorial and Capitol Building in Washington.
 
Richards says he has an affinitiy with the principles of Georgian neo-classical design, inspired by ancient Greece and Rome and later by the works of Andrea Palladio (1508-1580), the Italian stone mason from Vicenza who became the most influential architect in the Western world.  'Georgian buildings can make you feel you are living in a palace, at least on its first, principal floor, known as the ‘piano nobile,' says Richards.
 
 
Villa Cornaro north of Venice, designed by 16th century architect Andrea Palladio
Villa Saraceno, Vicenza
Somerset House bookends
Queen's House, Greenwich
Richards, who grew up in Corston outside Bath, practises plasterwork in the tradition of the great 19th century architectural model maker Francois Fouquet (some of whose works were bought by Sir John Soane and can be seen in the model room at the Sir John Soane Museum in London).
 
Models by Timothy Richards can be purchased from his website.  
 
Entry to No 1 Royal Crescent costs £10 for adults, £4 for children and £7 concessions.
The Richards' exhibition is sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and the BPT.
Bath is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
 
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