Take the bus, ditch the car

Take the bus, ditch the car

Liverpudlians are being urged to go by bus to help curb climate change

Liverpool City Region's Better By Bus campaign aims to get more people to leave their car at home and use other methods of transport...ie walk, cycle or hop on a bus. Polar bears will thank them for it.

Liverpool City Region’s Better By Bus campaign has launched an emotional plea for car drivers to consider their impact on the environment and leave the car at home.
 
Public Health England estimates air pollution – of which cars are a key cause – contributes to around 700 deaths a year in Liverpool City Region.
 
The new bus campaign, We Can’t Wait to Tackle Climate Change, highlights the dangerous levels of air pollution in the city region and the urgent changes in behaviour that needs to happen to protect the environment.
 
Earlier this year the authorities in Liverpool declared a climate emergency and their focus now is to make Liverpool the greenest city region in the UK.
 
In response, the area's bus service providers, Arriva, Stagecoach and Merseytravel, are using the climate as the rationale for their Better By Bus campaign. Lisa Pearson, campaign leader, says we can improve our local environments by taking simple decisions, such as not driving the car to the shops. 'We're at a vital crossroads, where real and meaningful action is the only way we can prevent further environmental damage. Climate change is is a global issue, but action at local level can have hugely beneficial results.
 
'In this campaign we’ve used some of the world’s most loved animals - an elephant, a polar bear and an orangutan - to demonstrate that the harmful emissions produced by cars is destroying these animals’ natural habitats.'
 
And if you think buses are a particulate-spewing diesel nightmare, well engineering advances means buses are becoming a green mode of transport. In Liverpool, 70 per cent of buses are powered by electric, hybrid or low emission engines, while most buses in the fleets are under seven years old. 
 
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